Hanti Station (한티역) Bundang Line – Station #K216

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Special thanks to Jordan Redmond for inviting us to Hanti and showing us around his neighborhood.  Jordan writes a food blog about his neighborhood, and to find out what’s good in the area we suggest you visit him at Daechi Dining.

There were ten different schools of one type or another listed on Hanti Station’s area map, which should give you some idea of what the neighborhood’s like.  Another clue: Jordan told us that a bum once asked him for a dollar as he was walking by.  In English.  Clearly this is a well-educated part of town.

Hanti mostly conformed to my pre-trip expectations: well-off, gentrified, family-oriented.  The intersection above the station hosted a large Lotte Department Store and was surrounded by a lot of new apartment towers.  To the northeast, as you walk down Dogok-ro (도곡로) from Exit 2 or 3 you’ll pass a multitude of hagwons.  Some of them are on the backstreets and have playful statues that look like monkeys and giraffes in red fur coats, and others are in their own office towers on the main avenue, their names in two-story-high billboards on their sides.  The concentration of academies turns the sidewalks into streams of four-foot textbook porters around ten o’clock every night, but if you’re there during the day, as we were, you might notice the no smoking signs that have been placed on the pavement, designating several blocks of the area smoke-free zones in another gesture signaling the kid-friendliness of Hanti.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Besides new apartment blocks and after-school academies, another recurring architectural feature of the neighborhood is churches, particularly large and not infrequently ugly ones.  One that we passed had an enormous stone sculpture of an open Bible, its pages a good three centimeters thick, and another, particularly garish one sat right on the main drag in what looked like a pale yellow airplane hangar that had been sawed in half.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Like in many other neighborhoods, Hanti’s back streets are often filled with five- or six-story brick or stone apartment buildings, but the ones here looked newer and generally spiccer-and-spanner than those elsewhere.  One of these buildings had been given the name ‘One Mans Village (sic),’ but several of the letters had fallen off the façade and it was now ‘O e Mans Age’ instead.  Interspersed with the apartment buildings were small neighborhood parks and schools, almost always with kids running around outside.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Occasionally something would break up the orderly residential façade and remind us that it wasn’t just an upper-middle class soundstage that we were walking through, like the graffiti on a wall southeast of the station.  Someone had stenciled pictures of a buck, a woman with a majestic afro, and a spray paint can, to which someone else had written ‘Whoever you are, I love your works,’ in response, to which someone else, presumably the stenciller, had replied, ‘Thank you!  You give me reason to spray more.’  Nearby there were also stencils of Audrey Hepburn, a crow, and a seagull, next to which, in stylized script, ‘Seagull 갈매기’ was written, perhaps the stencillers’ tag.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A few other things gave some texture to the neighborhood.  Most prominently were the rather baffling Eunma Town Apartments northeast of the station: a huge complex of identical white towers, 31 in all, that looked like they’d been stamped out by a giant mold.  The buildings were dingy and desperately in need of a paint job at the very least; some of them had tape over cracks in the windows or refuse piled up at the end of hallways as well, and playground areas were in need of some tending, but Jordan also said that his students had told him that the apartments were rather expensive.  Maybe they were nice inside, or maybe, with the educational opportunities nearby, parents were just paying for the location.  In any case, the cars in the parking spaces were nice ones and the people walking around all looked fairly well off, and the mixed signals left me imagining that Eunma was what you would have gotten if Singapore had gone Communist.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Although many Gangnam neighborhoods look like they’ve only gone up in the past ten years, their backstreets will often host buildings or markets that put paid to first impressions, and Hanti was no different.  Turning left on Seolleung-ro (선릉로) from Exit 8 and then left again on Seolleung-ro-63-gil (선릉로63길) brought us to Dogok Market (도곡시장).  A banner was strung above the entrance, encouraging visitors to use their produce (‘우리 농산물을 이용합니다.’), and beyond this was a small market that didn’t extend beyond that street and didn’t go for more than a couple blocks, but that had all the essentials and added an older wrinkle to the neighborhood.  Ladies were selling banchan in Styrofoam trays; there were burgundy eggplants, dried fish, figs, and twigim; and between several older buildings a lone pigeon was hanging out on a power line, surveying the scene below.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Hanti is very family-focused, but there is a bit of nightlife to be had on the streets behind the Lotte Department Store, out Exit 1 or 2, where restaurants, bars, and cafes are clustered.  The opportunity for a truly wild night out is limited, but if you work hard enough, to the point that you can’t drive your BMW or Audi home, you should have no trouble snagging a taxi.  Just outside of Exits 7 and 8 is a parking lot for a gisa sikdang (기사식당), or taxi driver restaurant.  On one side of the lot is an old mint green corrugated metal wall with the word 스낵카 (with ‘SNACKCAR’ spray painted in a small white font next to it) painted on it, next to which is a picture of a family, seemingly modeled on the Pringles man, eating ramen.  The restaurant on the opposite side is truly a snack car in a sense, as an old green and white school bus had been converted and attached to the restaurant where the drivers grabbed a meal in between fares.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dogok Market (도곡시장)

Exit 8

Left on Seolleung-ro (선릉로), Left on Seolleung-ro-63-gil (선릉로63길)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Hanti Station (한티역) Bundang Line – Station #K216

  1. Pingback: Weekly SEOUL: 5th DMZ Korea International Documentary Film Festival | SEOUL Magazine

  2. Eunma Apartments are often featured on the news as an example of real estate speculation gone wrong. Most apartment complexes here are torn down and “redeveloped” after about 30 years. Existing owners are entitled to an apartment in the new complex at a deeply discounted price. Developers make money by squeezing more units into the space with taller, denser complexes. Because of this, the prices of apartments that are about 25 years old shoot up. Eunma Apartment was completed in July of 1979, so people have long expected Eunma apartments to be scheduled for redevelopment. People bought homes there in the hopes of having shiny new apartments in a prime 대치동 location, within 5 years. So far, the redevelopment has not been scheduled and the buildings decay as people aren’t willing to remodel their soon-to-be-demolished apartments.

    • Hey Erik, thanks a lot for the info. That’s more or less what I expected was the situation with Eunma, as I’ve heard about that same thing with other complexes. Will be interesting to see how long Eunma stays standing. Thanks for reading!

  3. A 900sq.ft unit of Eunma ranges around US $800k- 900k. It used to be around $1.2 million. The rent is ‘cheaper’ than other apartments in Daechi because Eunma is so old, however, it is still a lot more expensive than the average rent in Seoul. The school district is very good around the area so we see many people living in Eunma to send their children to good schools.

    • Hey Joshua, thanks a lot for the comment and for that info. It’s great to get some more details on that place. Do you mind me asking where you got the info about the rents? I’m curious to know!

      – Charlie

      • I am Korean so I use various Korean real estate websites to find information about rents. It costs about 430 million won to ‘rent’ Eunma using Jeonse, which is a system where you deposit about 40-80% of the home’s value to the owner, compared to about 850 million won at a nearby Daechi I’Park apartment. Eunma is still a lot more expensive than other apartments in Seoul, however, it is cheaper than many other apartments in the area.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s